avalancer

ALL About Intake Systems

191 posts in this topic

Alright guys, I agree with some of you saying that it should be a thread about Intake Systems so here it is. ^_^

If some could be kind to describe and review (pros and cons) the following products, drop me an email to avalerin@yahoo.com and I will edit this post so everyone has easy access to this information by a sticky thread:

- Fujita SRI

- Road Race SRI

- Injen CAI

- K&N SRI (or CAI)

- Honey comb filter (any brand)

- DC Sports SRI

- Takeda SRI

Thanks for helping all our members with this information -_-

In the mean time, here are some descriptions of what is a SRI and what is a CAI

What is a SRI (took from wikipedia)

The short ram air intake (SRI) is a form of aftermarket air intake for automobiles with internal combustion engines.

It basically replaces the OEM air intake with a short metal pipe and air filter inside the engine bay. This can slightly boost performance levels in a vehicle by increasing air volume intake. A significant increase in intake air volume will only occur in an engine where the factory intake piping was restrictive.

There is still some open debate on this issue, but some believe that a problem with short ram air intakes is that the air entering the intake is at a higher temperature due to the proximity of the engine, which may reduce some power. This may be partially offset by an increase in the volume of air entering the engine. To counter intake heat problems, many short ram intakes include some form of heat shield. Moving the intake inlet port further away from the engine block will also help to alleviate the problem and some users use a cold air intake where the inlet air is at or close to ambient temperature. However, others claim that Short Ram Intakes (SRIs) or similar Warm Air Intakes (WAIs) offer benefits over Cold Air Intakes (CAIs) which include better MPG due to a more complete burning of fuel. Users with forced induction engines often opt for short ram intakes because compressors adjacent to the engine, especially turbochargers, heat the incoming air and negate much of the benefits of a cold air intake. Additional problems can result from using a short ram intake in cars utilizing a mass airflow sensor though most of today's sensors automatically adjust without issue. Turbulence in the intake airflow produced by the filter or piping, or a change in intake diameter at the point where the airflow is measured can produce inaccurate airflow readings. The error in airflow then translates to an error in the amount of added fuel. In the worst case, the air/fuel ratio can run lean, causing detonation and possibly engine failure although the airflow sensor will generally detect and correct the throttle to compensate for the warmer air. This can also be solved by modifying/elongating the intake piping, replacing the airflow meter, or by replacing/remapping the engine control computer to provide the correct amount of fuel for the intake airflow at all engine speeds. change

A harmless but noticeable result of using a short ram air intake is an increase in intake noise, which may manifest as a sucking sound, and the loss of any silencing properties that the factory intake had. In turbo cars which have a turbo pressure bypass valve, a short ram intake can produce a loud hissing sound when the throttle is lifted at high boost.

What is a CAI?

A cold air intake (CAI) is a device used to bring down the temperature of the air going into a car's internal-combustion engine, to increase engine power,. A secondary goal is to increase the visual appeal of a car by changing the appearance of the engine bay. It may also increase fuel economy by atomizing the fuel better for better combustion, and can increase the life of the engine by allowing it to run cooler.

Standard air intake systems tend to be very restrictive, in order to eliminate engine noise. Aftermarket cold air intake systems come in many different colors and sizes, and are easy to install when compared with other performance-increasing modifications. Usually screw drivers are the only necessary tools.

The aftermarket company K&N Engineering first offered air intake systems in the late 1980s. Those intakes consisted of rotationally-molded plastic intake tubes and a conical, cotton gauze air filter. In the late 1990s a proliferation of intake manufacturers such as AEM, Airaid, Injen, True Flow, and Volant entered the fray. In addition, oversea manufacturers imported their designs lending to the popularity of Japan domestic market (JDM) air intakes in sport compact markets. K&N and many of the other intake companies now offer intake systems in metal tube designs, allowing a greater degree of customization (the tubes can be powder-coated or painted to match a vehicle). In 2007 Schmidt Motor Works introduced a composite Ram Air Cleaner Cold Air Intake for American muscle cars with V8 engines.

All cold air intakes operate on the principle of increasing the amount of oxygen available for combustion with fuel. Because cooler air has more density for a given volume, cold air intakes generally work by introducing cooler air from outside the hot engine bay. However, the term "cold air intake" is often used to describe other methods of increasing oxygen to an engine, which may even increase the temperature of the air coming into an engine.

Some strategies used in designing cold-air intakes are:

increasing the diameter of the air intake, allowing increased airflow.

smoothing the interior of the intake to reduce air resistance.

providing a more direct route to the air intake.

tuning the length of the intake to provide maximum airflow at certain engine speeds (RPM).

using a more efficient, less restricting air filter.

Disadvantages

increased noise - air can be heard sucking into the engine (although some like the sound).

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Great info bro. Heres a add-on from How Stuff Works CLICK ME!

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Great job, I feel this will be very helpful for those that have many questions about the different intake systems.

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nice!

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hey guys, what you think what s the best for an 1.8 without turbo (instyle-european version)?????????

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hey guys, what you think what s the best for an 1.8 without turbo (instyle-european version)?????????
Ummm I would def say SRI
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I HAVE A AEM COLD AIR INTAKE FOR SALE COMPLETE BRND NEW 250.00 ANYBODY LOCATE I LIVE IN S. EL MONTE CALIFORNIA? EMAIL ME AT BIGBASS1124@YAHOO.COM

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so for our cars... NOT turbo, nor rally... SRI is the best?

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I guess the sri is the best choice for our cars. i believe.

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nice info dude..cai for me...lol

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I have a question a mitsubishi mecanic told me that CAI and SRI intakes actually lowers the cars HP because it bogs the engine with air and since you dont have more spark or fuel coming in the cars losess performance is it true because Im not risking to loose my warranty for something that wont increase my performance significantly!!!

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they wont void your warrenty unless they caused the problem inwhich you are tring to get fixed.

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Need some opinions. I live in a pretty dry (and a little dusty area). I'm looking into some kinda air intake. So a SRI would be better than a CAI for my 2.4L GTS? Or would leaving the stock intake be just the same?

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since you are in a dry area get a CAI because you wont have to worry about liquid getting in your intake

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worry about liquid getting in your intake
lol you say liquid like something other then water will be on the road splashing up
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Is rain really that big a concern for a CAI, and do the hydrosheilds really help??

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yes hydrosheilds do help!! and our engins dont really have enough power to suck up enough water to hurt it so we should be good on the cai.

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worry about liquid getting in your intake
lol you say liquid like something other then water will be on the road splashing up
(l) oops......well, you never know if you get in a puddle full of soda
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Where I live you probably have a higher chance of driving through soda just cause it never rains here. X-D

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(l)

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Im new in this forum, I was reading about CAI and SRI and I live on Puerto Rico, sometimes dry, sometimes a lot of rain. I just want to know what is best for my 09 Lancer GTS, CAI or SRI (because the water that could came into the engine)???

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